Sculptures of the natural world: made from reused wire

Sculptures of the natural world: made from reused wire

You know, there are are some really damn creative people out there. I am always looking for things that fascinate me. Looking for people whom have a true talent, go about using their talent humbly and nurture it. One such person is Annie Kendall. I have been watching her take some old wire or fencing and turn it into a lifesize animal or a windswept tree even. Dogs, deer, hares. Nothing seems too much for her with a creative thought, creative touch and a challenge to be made. I managed to catch up with her to find out more along with showing just a few of the marvellous sculptures she has made.

fox 4 wire sculptures Sculptures of the natural world: made from reused wire

How did you get started with this great creative idea Annie?

It started in 2008 with a gorse bush and some chicken wire jammed behind the greenhouse. Sitting on the veranda, the evening sun silhouetted the gorse bush in the garden and a running greyhound, just at that point when all its legs meet in the middle, could be seen in its heart. The gorse was clipped and the Gorse Hound whelped. A whim of, “I wonder if I could make a hare from this old wire to go with the Gorse Hound?” and the first wire sculpture happened.

PICT2952 wire sculptures Sculptures of the natural world: made from reused wire

After having to give up her beloved job managing kennels in the south of the country Annie returned home to the Lake District in 2012. Needing to work she decided to try making a living from her wire sculptures and so, in November of that year, Annie’s Wire Works was born.

A lifetime with dogs and animals has given Annie constant glimpses of snapshots in time. Some pieces sit quietly and others are full on, full speed and at rakish angles.

doggikin 017 wire sculptures Sculptures of the natural world: made from reused wire

PICT2656 wire sculptures Sculptures of the natural world: made from reused wire

I saw lots of added personal touches on the sculptures, a little of Annie’s lovely sense of humour comes out so don’t be surprised by a squirrel chewing a metal nut, as in “nut and bolt” and not hazel.

angela squirrel 030 wire sculptures Sculptures of the natural world: made from reused wire

She gave me a wonderful tagline: Make a big impact on your environment.. with only a little impact on ‘The’ environment. That led me into learning more of the making process. Agricultural fencing, chicken, barbed, electric wire coupled with a pair of wire cutters and a couple of pairs of pliers are the sum total of Annie’s Wire Works.

Using reclaimed wire collected from farmers, landowners, general folk and even a computer company Annie produces her beautiful sculptures using hand tools and no electricity. Weather permitting she prefers to work outside in natural daylight and aims to have a minimal carbon footprint.

PICT3097 wire sculptures Sculptures of the natural world: made from reused wire

working cocker 023 wire sculptures Sculptures of the natural world: made from reused wire

Annie’s website has more information on the background and the world of sculptures that can be made. A Facebook page link is there too so you can see latest pictures of new sculptures :)

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About Paul Steele

Founder of BaldHiker.com and avid hiker, climber and trekker. Never liking to sit still and always seeking new adventures around the world. Sharing personal views here and tweeting live via @paul_steele

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4 Responses to "Sculptures of the natural world: made from reused wire"

  1. Aidan  November 17, 2013 at 11:00

    There is something very wild, yet comforting about these sculptures, maybe it is their position in nature.

    Reply
    • Paul Steele  November 17, 2013 at 11:05

      Hi Aidan.. wonderful aren’t they? Annie has an eye for position as well as making I agree :)

      Reply
  2. Frazer Irwin FCD  November 11, 2013 at 10:18

    Some school kids made sheep from willow wands for our Millennium Green. I told the councillors they wouldn’t last long. However this looks more sturdy.

    Reply
    • Paul Steele  November 17, 2013 at 11:06

      They are very sturdy yes Fraxer.. Annie puts so many hours into each one it is unbelievable :)

      Reply

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