I have just spent a few days again in the wonderful place that is Edinburgh. As you’ll know from some of my other blogs this is a regular City break for us and it was a joy to be back in the city again. Although we did the usual walks around the city, went to the theatre and spent a bit of time in a jazz club (fantastic singer song writer) – it was the National Museum of Scotland on Charlotte Street that attracted my camera’s attention this time.

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The original Royal Museum building was started in 1861 and completed in 1888. It’s Grand Gallery is a masterpiece of Victorian wrought iron and glass – flooded with light. The original building has had numerous extensions over the years and it was the latest one of these that really attracted my photographic attention. This extension is the Museum of Scotland building completed in the late 1990s. It was a controversial in its time with Prince Charles, no less, resigning as patron of the museum, in protest at the lack of consultation over its design.

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As wikipedia puts it: “The building is made up of geometric, Corbusian forms, but also has numerous references to Scotland, such as brochs and castellated, defensive architecture. It is clad in golden Moray sandstone, which one of its architects, Gordon Benson, has called “the oldest exhibit in the building”, a reference to Scottish geology. The building was a 1999 Stirling Prize nominee”.

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It’s a fascinating building with lots of glimpses of other levels through small gaps, windows and balconies. Anyway, for me it allowed me to fully indulge my minimal tendencies! Most of the shots are taken in the Museum of Scotland end. The slow shutter speed ones of people are taken in the Grand Gallery looking down on the museum visitors. Enjoy!

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